Barton History

There are records of a Wesleyan Society in Barton-upon-Humber dating back to 1760 when they were meeting at a house in King Street. In 1788 land was purchased in Cottage Lane and a building erected. As the Society grew, the need for larger premises was identified. Land was purchased and a Chapel built on the present site. This was opened for divine services on the 9th October 1816. The Cottage Lane building was retained and used as a school until 1825.

             

When the chapel was opened in 1816 the Society Register showed only forty-six members. By 1839 the number had increased to two-hundred, with an additional seven hundred “ hearers” and the Chapel had to be enlarged. Two years later more land was purchased, with vestries, Sunday school rooms and classrooms being built. A new organ was installed in 1841 and in 1846 the chapel was registered for solemnizing marriages.

            

In late 1859 the Trustees considered the need for further enlargement of the building and decided that a rebuild was the only option. On the 22nd May 1860 demolition was complete,and the foundation stones were formally laid for the new building. Five months later the Chapel was ready. The official opening, marked by the delivery of sermons by popular preachers, was held during the first few days of 1861.
Further significant demolition and building work occurred in 1905 when the lecture hall and other rooms were built, and the premises took their present form. These rooms are now widely used by various groups, both local and from farther afield, and are a significant resource for our community.

In late 1859 the Trustees considered the need for further enlargement of the building and decided that a rebuild was the only option. On the 22nd May 1860 demolition was complete,and the foundation stones were formally laid for the new building. Fivemonths later the Chapel was ready. The official opening, marked by the delivery of sermons by popular preachers, was held during the first few days of 1861.
Further significant demolition and building work occurred in 1905 when the lecture hall and other rooms were built, and the premises took their present form. These rooms are now widely used by various groups, both local and from farther afield, and are a significant resource for our community.

In 1868 a Chapel and Sunday School was built in Waterside Road and gifted to the Wesleyan Society because of the need identified for that area of the town.  Early records of Primitive Methodism appear to have been lost, but it is likely that this branch of Methodism was formed in the Town around 1818. A chapel was built in Newport in 1838 resulting from the sale of an earlier building in King Street. That chapel was extended in 1844.

A new building in Queen Street was opened in 1867;  this the current home of the Salvation Army.  The 1932 Deed of Union bonded the Methodist traditions. In 1960, local needs brought the three Barton-upon-Humber Methodist Churches together as a single Society, and based at the Holydyke premises. The Church was re-designated as the Trinity Methodist Church to reflect the traditions of the three separate societies.

                    

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